Thursday, March 02, 2006

Are you a cheese curl or coffee ice cream cone?

You are what you eat.
Well, actually... yeah... sort of.
Neurologist Alan Hirsch, author of "What's Your Food Sign? How to Use Food Cues to Find True Love," has discovered that he can tell a lot about a person by looking at what she prefers to eat. He gave personality tests to 18,631 married people and asked them to choose their favorites from a variety of foods. He calls his theory a "food Rorschach test" and said his findings are true 95% of the time.
So, what's your favorite food?
Here's a taste of how the New York Post reported it:

ICE CREAM

Coffee ice cream lovers live life with gusto. They don't vest too much time thinking about the future. Most compatible with strawberry lovers.

Double chocolate chunkers are self-absorbed drama-queens who may be charming, seductive and flirtatious. They might be gullible and trusting, so thrive best in intimate, close relationships. Compatible with butter pecans or chocolate chips.

Vanillas are dependent, needy idealists who are most com-fortable in a secure relationship. Compatible with rocky roads and other vanillas.

SNACKS

If you like pretzels, you're over-committed, fad-following, quirky and fun. You're good with other pretzels, but may fall for chips and cheese curls.

Tortilla chips: You're a justice-minded perfectionist who's always on time. Stick with other tortilla chips.

Potato chips: You're a competitive high-achiever. Compatible with chips and pretzels.

VEGETABLES & FRUITS

If you prefer fresh apples, pineapple glaze and corn on the cob, you don't like taking "no" for an answer and have a work-hard, play-hard ethic.

If you like most of the following items: bananas, broiled fish, fruit, honey, tapioca, nuts and hot curry, you're a natural optimist who values friends and is easy to work with. If you don't like most of those foods? You're a suspicious pessimist with trust issues.

Men who favor strawberries tend to be insecure and suffer from feelings of inadequacy. They also like to be dominated.

Like spicy pickles? You're probably a pessimist.

Now, that's some food for thought.

Who gets a street named after them?

What committee decides whether a person deserves to have a street named after them, post-mortem? I mean, really. Come on!

Well, actually, someone must, because Peter Jennings has his own street near ABC News' studios in Manhattan.

A portion of West 66th Street is now also known as Peter Jennings Way.

I am clearly not a part of this streets-named-for-dead-folk committee, or I'd known about this way earlier. So, I will refrain from giving my opinion about whether the late, esteemed journalist should be living it up (err, wrong terminology, sorry) on the West side.

All joking aside, though, this does beg the question of who is deserving of such an honor and who makes that call.

Make up your mind already!

I've always been an indecisive clod, worrying too much over how any choice I make might affect my entire life. Then, after I've finally relented and made a decision, I wonder, "What if? How might things have been different if I'd gone with Door #2 instead of #1?"

When folks think about their choices too hard and for too long, the decision becomes more difficult and the more likely they are to not be happy with their final choice, according to stories recently published by Slate.com, Yahoo News and the New York Times.

The news stories state that simple decisions are more wisely made when they are pored over a bit, but the same is not true when the decision is more complex and difficult to make.

Ultimately, the study seems to say that we ought to listen to our gut instinct, our first choice, because we are more likely to be happy with it in the long run.
Some theorize that this is because our unconscious brain is better at complex reasoning or can better handle an overload of info than can our conscious brain.

There are plenty of theories and ideas swarming around this story, but my first guess, my gut instinct, is that we should trust those instincts because they are just that - part of our animal being, the way in which God or nature (you choose) intended for us to know what to do in life.

Of course, if you're a fatalist, there's always that possibility, too -- When things are meant to be, they happen. That's also known as, "God has a funny way of working things out."

And if you don't believe in fate or God, perhaps you can sum it up as, "Your heart knows better than your head."

Sunday, February 26, 2006

Daily Image


"flippinBird" from Cornershots.com, a collection of photographs taken by uber-talented urban photog "Jimmie of Brooklyn."

He delights all by chronicling urban architecture and infrastructure (skyscrapers, fire escapes, overpasses and such), and you'll likely see more of him here and elsewhere.